Meet The 39 Year Old World’s First Test Tube Baby

 

British Woman, Louise Joy Brown known as the first test tube baby to be born, is the first human to have been born after conception by in vitro fertilisation, or IVF. She was delivered through planned Caesarean section at the Oldham General Hospital, Greater Manchester, UK, by registrar John Webster on 25 July 1978.

She weighed 5 pounds, 12 ounces (2.608 kg) at birth. Her parents, Lesley and John Brown, had been trying to conceive for nine years. Lesley faced complications of blocked fallopian tubes.

On 10 November 1977, Lesley Brown underwent a procedure, later to become known as IVF (in vitro fertilisation), developed by Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards. Edwards was awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Medicine for this work.

 

Although the media referred to Brown as a “test tube baby”, her conception actually took place in a Petri dish. Her younger sister, Natalie Brown, was also conceived through IVF four years later, and became the world’s fortieth child after conception by IVF.

 

In May 1999, Natalie was the first human born after conception by IVF to give birth herself—without IVF—to daughter Casey. Natalie has subsequently had three additional children; sons Christopher, Daniel, and Aeron, the last of whom was born in August 2013.

In 2004, Brown married nightclub doorman (bouncer) Wesley Mullinder. Dr. Edwards attended their wedding. Their son Cameron, conceived naturally, was born on 20 December 2006. Brown’s second son, Aiden Patrick Robert, was born in August 2013.

 

Brown’s father died in 2007. Her mother died on 6 June 2012 in Bristol Royal Infirmary at the age of 64 due to complications from a gallbladder infection.

History of In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF)

Signs for achieving in vitro fertilisation (IVF) was first reported in 1953, when some Australian Foxton School researchers reported a transient biochemical pregnancy. John Rock was the first to extract an intact fertilised egg.

In 1959, Min Chueh Chang at the Worcester Foundation, proved fertilisation in vitro was capable of proceeding to a birth of a live rabbit. Chang’s discovery was seminal, as it clearly demonstrated that oocytes fertilised in vitro were capable of developing, if transferred into the uterus and thereby produce live young.

The first pregnancy achieved through in vitro human fertilisation of a human oocyte was reported in The Lancet from the Monash University team of Carl Wood, John Leeton and Alan Trounson in 1973, although it lasted only a few days and would today be called a biochemical pregnancy.

Landrum Shettles attempted to perform an IVF in 1973, but his departmental chairman interdicted the procedure at the last moment.

There was also an ectopic pregnancy reported by Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards in 1976. In 1977, Steptoe and Edwards successfully carried out a pioneering conception which resulted in the birth of Louise Brown, the world’s first baby to be conceived by IVF, in 1978.

Doctor Ibrahim Wada, Chief Consultant Obstetrician/Gynaecologist and Chief IVF Specialist

IVF in Nigeria

One of the pioneer medical practitioner on in vitro fertilisation, Doctor Ibrahim Wada during the NTA Good Morning Nigeria show said that about 60 known clinics have keyed into the the medical reproductive technique and are also members of the association of fertility and reproductive health in Nigeria, describing it as a  major development.

Dr. Wada a Chief Consultant Obstetrician/Gynaecologist and Chief IVF Specialist, when talking about the cost and availability, said the IVF is still in motion and that it will soon be.

He said now government hospitals are coming, the first, the National hospital in Abuja celebrated its 10 anniversary and offering it at a cheaper rate to Nigerians.

In the public private partnership, Wada said the Garki hospital first test tube baby (through IVF) and that the first child is almost 2 years old now.

Wada,  In 1996, founded Nisa Premier Hospital as a dedicated fertility and assisted conception unit. The Centre’s breakthrough in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) in 1998 was the first test tube baby authenticated by the Federal Government in Nigeria.

More than 1000 IVF and intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) live births have been recorded in the hospital since then. Nigeria’s first ever “deep freeze” baby was born in Nisa Premier Hospital on 12th October 2001.

Doctor Kenneth Egwuda  of the Gynae Ville Hospital Jos, said IVF started three years ago in Jos and that the first baby delivered should be 3 to 4 years old now.

Doctor Kenneth Egwuda

He said a feat was achieved recently in their facility, when a 63 year old woman conceived through IVF after the 4th attempt and her first attempt in Jos delivered a baby and are all doing well. Dr. Egwuda said this make her in history the oldest woman to conceive and deliver through IVF.

He said this was witnessed by the Plateau state government and covered by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and other media outfit.

WORLD BREASTFEEDING WEEK

WABA / WORLD BREASTFEEDING WEEK

Breastfeeding is universal, it’s protects children everywhere and gives them the best, healthiest start in life!

No country in the world fully meets recommended standards for breastfeeding. The Global Breastfeeding Scorecard, which evaluated 194 nations, found that only 40 per cent of children younger than six months are breastfed exclusively (given nothing but breast milk) and only 23 countries have exclusive breastfeeding rates above 60 per cent.

Breastfeeding has an extraordinary range of benefits.

Evidence shows that breastfeeding has cognitive and health benefits for both infants and their mothers. It is especially critical during the first six months of life, helping prevent diarrhoea and pneumonia, two major causes of death in infants. Mothers who breastfeed have a reduced risk of ovarian and breast cancer, two leading causes of death . Breastmilk works like a baby’s first vaccine, protecting infants from potentially deadly diseases and giving them all the nourishment they need to survive and thrive.

Breastfeeding is one of the most effective – and cost effective – investments nations can make in the health of their youngest members and the future health of their economies and societies. It improves nutrition ,prevents child mortality and decreases the risk of non-communicable diseases ,and supports cognitive development and education
Breastfeeding is also an enabler to ending poverty, promoting economic growth and reducing inequalities.

In addition,
The act of breastfeeding itself stimulates proper growth of the mouth and jaw, and secretion of hormones for digestion and satiety. Breastfeeding creates a special bond between mother and baby and the interaction between the mother and child during breastfeeding has positive repercussions for life, in terms of stimulation, behaviour, speech, sense of wellbeing and security and how the child relates to other people.

Breastfeeding also lowers the risk of chronic conditions later in life, such as obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, childhood asthma and childhood leukaemias. Studies have shown that breastfed infants do better on intelligence and behaviour tests into adulthood than formula-fed babies.

For more information please contact: +234 8172175011, +2348172175013, +23408172175011, +23408174210021

What You Need to Know About Childhood Immunizations

What You Need to Know About Childhood Immunizations

1. Why your child should be vaccinated

Immunizations protect children from dangerous childhood diseases. Any of these diseases can cause serious complications

and can even kill.

We are also warned to immunize our children, ourselves as adults, and the elderly.

2. Diseases that childhood vaccines prevent

  • Diptheria
  • Haemophilus Influenzae type b (Hib disease – a major cause of bacterial meningitis)
  • HepititisA
  • HepititisB
  • Human papillomavirus(HPV – a major cause of cervical and other cancers)
  • Influenza
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal
  • Mumps
  • Pertussis (Whooping Cough)
  • Pneumococcal (causes bacterial meningitis and blood infections)
  • Polio
  • Rotavirus
  • Rubella (German Measles)
  • Tetanus (Lockjaw)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)

3. Number of doses your child needs

The following vaccinations are recommended by age two and can be given over five visits to a doctor or clinic:

  • 4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus & pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
  • 3-4 doses of Hib vaccine (depending on the brand used)
  • 4 doses of pneumococcal vaccine
  • 3 doses of polio vaccine
  • 2 doses of hepatitis A vaccine
  • 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine
  • 1 dose of measles, mumps & rubella vaccine (MMR)
  • 2-3 doses of rotavirus vaccine (depending on the brand used)
  • 1 dose of varicella vaccine
  • 1 or 2 annual doses of influenza vaccine (number of doses depends on influenza vaccine history)

4. Like any medicine,vaccines can cause minor side effects

Side effects can occur with any medicine, including vaccines. Depending on the vaccine, these can include: slight fever, rash, or soreness at the site of injection. Slight discomfort is normal and should not be a cause for alarm.

5. It’s extremely rare, but vaccines can cause serious reactions — weigh the risks!

Serious reactions to vaccines are extremely rare. The risk of serious complications from a disease that could have been prevented by vaccination is far greater than the risk of a serious reaction to a vaccine.

6. What to do if your child has a serious reaction.

If you think your child is experiencing a persistent or severe reaction, call your doctor or get the child to a doctor right away. Write down what happened and the date and time it happened.

7. Why you should not wait to vaccinate

Children under 5 are especially susceptible to disease because their immune systems have not built up the necessary defenses to fight infection. By immunizing on time (by age 2), you can protect your child from disease and also protect others at school or daycare.

8. Be sure to track your shots via a health record

A vaccination health record helps you and your health care provider keep your child’s vaccinations on schedule. If you move or change providers, having an accurate record might prevent your child from having to repeat vaccinations he or she has already had. A shot record should be started when your child receives his/her first vaccination and updated with each vaccination visit.

Keep immunizing until disease is eliminated.

Unless we can “stop the leak” (eliminate the disease), it is important to keep immunizing.

Nisa Workshop Series

NISA HOSPITAL COMMENCES HER 2017 WORKSHOP SERIES

Nisa Hospital, on the 20th of April 2017 organized a Continuing Medical Professional Education tagged ‘Childcare referral system Workshop’. The workshop is intended to provide a platform for the discussion of best practices in the implementation of child care referral systems within our immediate healthcare community. Participation in the workshop also attracts a 5 CME credit points accredited by the Nigeria Medical and Dental Council.

This high quality educational activity for Physicians and other health care professionals emphasised on the use, cutting-edge technologies and medical advances in child care.

The event was chaired by the Acting Secretary of the Health and Human Resource Secretariat FCTA who was ably represented by the Head of Planning, FCT Primary Health Board; Dr Sebastine Esomonu and co-chaired by Dr Udeoni – FCTA Health and Human Resource Secretariat. Also in attendance was a guest speaker from National Hospital Abuja.

Dr Sebastine Esomonu (Head of Planning, FCT Primary Health Board)

The Founder and Executive Vice-Chairman of Nisa Hospital referred to the workshop as ‘a networking system where practitioners from different hospitals in the FCT are brought together to address the issue of referral crisis and to improve on referral network and ease communication between the health practitioners’.

Dr Jaiyeola I.O, Group Head, Managed Care opened the workshop lecture with the topic ‘Challenges of childcare referral system’. Dr Audu L.I, a Chief Consultant Paediatrician/Neonatology at the National Hospital Abuja presented on ‘Optimising Child Care referral’ reiterated the fact that sick children will have more access to quality healthcare if there was a proper referral system. Dr Hananiah and Dr Eze of the Paediatric Department of Nisa Hospital educated the patients on ‘Infection in Sickle cell disease’ and ‘Survival of the under-5s’ respectively, while  Dr Olagunju of the Neonatology Unit spoke on the ‘Quality of care for the preterm baby’.

Dr Kike Olagunju (Neonatology Unit)                            Dr Antoniah Hananiah (Paediatrics Unit)

The high point of the event was the interactive Q&A session where the participants and speakers traded knowledge and experiences; some practical solutions to the challenges besieging the healthcare system in Nigeria were also proffered.

 

Certificate of participants was issued and the workshop ended with a group photograph.

 

What You Should Know About Meningitis

Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges; the meninges are the three membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. It stems from viral and bacterial infections. Other causes may include:

  • cancer
  • chemical irritation
  • fungi
  • drug allergies

Viral and bacterial meningitis are contagious. The symptoms may include fever, headache, stiff neck, and fatigue, rash, sore throat and intestinal symptoms may also occur.

They can be transmitted by coughing, sneezing, or close contact.

Some cases of meningitis improve without treatment (viral) in a few weeks. Others can be life-threatening (Bacterial) and require emergent antibiotic treatment.

The best way to protect yourself and your child of bacterial meningitis is to complete the recommended vaccine schedule and also maintaining a healthy lifestyle!

International Women’s day!

 International Women’s day!

Being  International Women’s day!, we are looking at infertility in women, so we could reduce if possible ,eradicate this issue completely by proffering solutions!

Infertility is a condition that affects approximately 1 out of every 6 couples. An infertility diagnosis is given to a couple that has been unsuccessful in efforts to conceive over the course of one full year. When the cause of infertility exists within the female partner, it is referred to as female infertility. Female infertility factors contribute to approximately 50% of all infertility cases, and female infertility alone accounts for approximately one-third of all infertility cases.

Female Infertility: Causes, Treatment And Prevention

What causes female infertility?

The most common causes of female infertility include problems with ovulation,  damage to fallopian tubes or uterus, or problems with the cervix. Age can contribute to infertility because as a woman ages, her fertility naturally tends to decrease.

Ovulation problems may be caused by one or more of the following:

  • A hormone imbalance
  • A tumor or cyst
  • Eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia
  • Alcohol or drug use
  • Thyroid gland problems
  • Excess weight
  • Stress
  • Intense exercises that causes a significant loss of body fat
  • Extremely brief menstrual cycle

Damage to the fallopian tubes or uterus can be caused by one or more of the following:

  • Pelvic inflammatory disease
  • A previous infection
  • Polyps in the uterus
  • Endometriosis or fibroids
  • Scar tissue or adhesions
  • Chronic medical illness
  • A certain ectopic (tubal) pregnancy
  • A birth defect
  • DES syndrome (The medication DES, given to women to prevent miscarriage or premature birth can result in fertility problems for their children.)

Abnormal cervical mucus can also cause infertility. Abnormal cervical mucus can prevent the sperm from reaching the egg or make it more difficult for the sperm to penetrate the egg.

How is female infertility diagnosed?

Potential female infertility is assessed as part of a thorough physical exam. The exam will include a medical history regarding potential factors that could contribute to infertility.

Healthcare providers may use one or more of the following tests/exams to evaluate fertility:

  • A urine or blood test to check for infections or a hormone problem, including thyroid function
  • Pelvic exam and breast exam
  • A sample of cervical mucus and tissue to determine if ovulation is occurring
  • Laparoscope inserted into the abdomen to view the condition of organs and to look for blockage, adhesions or scar tissue.
  • HSG, which is an x-ray used in conjunction with a colored liquid inserted into the fallopian tubes making it easier for the technician to check for blockage.
  • Hysteroscopy uses a tiny telescope with a fiber light to look for uterine abnormalities.
  • Ultrasound to look at the uterus and ovaries. May be done vaginally or abdominally.
  • Sonohystogram combines an ultrasound and saline injected into the uterus to look for abnormalities or problems.

Tracking your ovulation through fertility awareness will also help your healthcare provider assess your fertility status

How is female infertility treated?

Female infertility is most often treated by one or more of the following methods:

  • Taking hormones to address a hormone imbalance, endometriosis, or a short menstrual cycle
  • Taking medications to stimulate ovulation
  • Using supplements to enhance fertility
  • Taking antibiotics to remove an infection
  • Having minor surgery to remove blockage or scar tissues from the fallopian tubes, uterus, or pelvic area.

Can female infertility be prevented?

There is usually nothing that can be done to prevent female infertility caused by genetic problems or illness.

However, there are several things that women can do to decrease the possibility of infertility:

  • Take steps to erase sexually transmitted diseases
  • Avoid illicit drugs
  • Avoid heavy or frequent alcohol use
  • Adopt good personal hygiene and health practices
  • Have annual check ups with your GYN once you are sexually active

When should I contact my healthcare provider?

It is important to contact your healthcare provider if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fever
  • Unusual discharge
  • Pain or discomfort during intercourse
  • Soreness or itching in the vaginal area

Some couples want to explore more traditional or over the counter efforts before exploring infertility procedures. If you are trying to get pregnant and looking for resources to support your efforts, we invite you to check us out at Nisa Premier Hospital, Jabi, Abuja.

However, if you are looking for testing or options to increase your fertility chances of conception, you can find a fertility specialist her at Nisa Premier Hospital or call +2348172410027.

 

Open Day/Free Counseling

Nisa Premier Hospital IVF clinic features an Open Day/Free Counseling service, which include general talk on infertility and gynaecology. Presented and discussed by eminent Specialists. You will find answers to all your questions on these topics, and more:

Ovulatory problems
 Pelvic and tubal factor
 Cervical factor
Fibroid
 Male infertility
Unexplained infertility
 Endometriosis
This takes place every 1st Saturday of the month at our hospital premises.

Three Common Folic Acid Myths

We receive a lot of questions about folic acid. Here are three of the most common misconceptions people seem to have.

Myth #1: Folic acid reduces the risk for ALL birth defects.

TRUTH: Folic acid reduces the risk of certain birth defects.

Folic acid reduces the risk for a very specific type of birth defect called a neural tube defect (NTD). The neural tube is the part of a developing baby that becomes the brain and spinal cord. A NTD can happen when the neural tube doesn’t close completely. This results in birth defects such as anencephaly and spina bifida. If all women take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid every day before getting pregnant and during early pregnancy, it may help reduce the number of pregnancies affected by NTDs by up to 70 percent.

Myth #2: Folic acid will help me to get pregnant.

TRUTH: Folic acid is important to take before pregnancy, but it will not help you to become pregnant. Folic acid does not help a woman to conceive. However, it is recommended that ALL women take folic acid, even if they are not trying to get pregnant. This is because folic acid can help prevent neural tube defects only if it is taken BEFORE pregnancy and during the first few weeks of pregnancy, often before a woman even knows she is pregnant.

The neural tube is one of the first structures that is formed in a developing embryo, therefore you need to make sure you are taking folic acid BEFORE you are pregnant. And because nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States are unplanned, it’s important that all women take folic acid every day, even if they are not planning to get pregnant. So take a multivitamin that has 400 micrograms of folic acid in it every day. Most multivitamins have this amount, but check the label to be sure.

Myth #3: I eat a healthy diet, so I can get enough folic acid from food.

TRUTH: It may be possible, but most women will not get enough from their diet.

Folic acid is naturally available in many fruits and vegetables, including:

Beans, like lentils, pinto beans and black beans

Leafy green vegetables, like spinach and Romaine lettuce

Asparagus, Broccoli, Peanuts (But don’t eat them if you have a peanut allergy)

Citrus fruits, like oranges and grapefruit.

Many flours, breads, cereals, and pasta are fortified with folic acid, as well. This means they have folic acid added to them. You can look for the words “fortified” or “enriched” on the package to know if the product has folic acid in it. However, it’s hard to get all the folic acid you need from food. According to the experts, your body only absorbs about 50 % of that. So even if you eat foods that have folic acid in them, make sure you take your multivitamin each day too.

Some women, like those who’ve had a pregnancy affected by NTDs or women with sickle cell disease, may need more folic acid. Talk to your provider to make sure you get the right amount.

Re-edited By Nisa Media Team

 

1 2 3