What You Need to Know About Childhood Immunizations

What You Need to Know About Childhood Immunizations

1. Why your child should be vaccinated

Immunizations protect children from dangerous childhood diseases. Any of these diseases can cause serious complications

and can even kill.

We are also warned to immunize our children, ourselves as adults, and the elderly.

2. Diseases that childhood vaccines prevent

  • Diptheria
  • Haemophilus Influenzae type b (Hib disease – a major cause of bacterial meningitis)
  • HepititisA
  • HepititisB
  • Human papillomavirus(HPV – a major cause of cervical and other cancers)
  • Influenza
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal
  • Mumps
  • Pertussis (Whooping Cough)
  • Pneumococcal (causes bacterial meningitis and blood infections)
  • Polio
  • Rotavirus
  • Rubella (German Measles)
  • Tetanus (Lockjaw)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)

3. Number of doses your child needs

The following vaccinations are recommended by age two and can be given over five visits to a doctor or clinic:

  • 4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus & pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
  • 3-4 doses of Hib vaccine (depending on the brand used)
  • 4 doses of pneumococcal vaccine
  • 3 doses of polio vaccine
  • 2 doses of hepatitis A vaccine
  • 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine
  • 1 dose of measles, mumps & rubella vaccine (MMR)
  • 2-3 doses of rotavirus vaccine (depending on the brand used)
  • 1 dose of varicella vaccine
  • 1 or 2 annual doses of influenza vaccine (number of doses depends on influenza vaccine history)

4. Like any medicine,vaccines can cause minor side effects

Side effects can occur with any medicine, including vaccines. Depending on the vaccine, these can include: slight fever, rash, or soreness at the site of injection. Slight discomfort is normal and should not be a cause for alarm.

5. It’s extremely rare, but vaccines can cause serious reactions — weigh the risks!

Serious reactions to vaccines are extremely rare. The risk of serious complications from a disease that could have been prevented by vaccination is far greater than the risk of a serious reaction to a vaccine.

6. What to do if your child has a serious reaction.

If you think your child is experiencing a persistent or severe reaction, call your doctor or get the child to a doctor right away. Write down what happened and the date and time it happened.

7. Why you should not wait to vaccinate

Children under 5 are especially susceptible to disease because their immune systems have not built up the necessary defenses to fight infection. By immunizing on time (by age 2), you can protect your child from disease and also protect others at school or daycare.

8. Be sure to track your shots via a health record

A vaccination health record helps you and your health care provider keep your child’s vaccinations on schedule. If you move or change providers, having an accurate record might prevent your child from having to repeat vaccinations he or she has already had. A shot record should be started when your child receives his/her first vaccination and updated with each vaccination visit.

Keep immunizing until disease is eliminated.

Unless we can “stop the leak” (eliminate the disease), it is important to keep immunizing.

Nisa Workshop Series

NISA HOSPITAL COMMENCES HER 2017 WORKSHOP SERIES

Nisa Hospital, on the 20th of April 2017 organized a Continuing Medical Professional Education tagged ‘Childcare referral system Workshop’. The workshop is intended to provide a platform for the discussion of best practices in the implementation of child care referral systems within our immediate healthcare community. Participation in the workshop also attracts a 5 CME credit points accredited by the Nigeria Medical and Dental Council.

This high quality educational activity for Physicians and other health care professionals emphasised on the use, cutting-edge technologies and medical advances in child care.

The event was chaired by the Acting Secretary of the Health and Human Resource Secretariat FCTA who was ably represented by the Head of Planning, FCT Primary Health Board; Dr Sebastine Esomonu and co-chaired by Dr Udeoni – FCTA Health and Human Resource Secretariat. Also in attendance was a guest speaker from National Hospital Abuja.

Dr Sebastine Esomonu (Head of Planning, FCT Primary Health Board)

The Founder and Executive Vice-Chairman of Nisa Hospital referred to the workshop as ‘a networking system where practitioners from different hospitals in the FCT are brought together to address the issue of referral crisis and to improve on referral network and ease communication between the health practitioners’.

Dr Jaiyeola I.O, Group Head, Managed Care opened the workshop lecture with the topic ‘Challenges of childcare referral system’. Dr Audu L.I, a Chief Consultant Paediatrician/Neonatology at the National Hospital Abuja presented on ‘Optimising Child Care referral’ reiterated the fact that sick children will have more access to quality healthcare if there was a proper referral system. Dr Hananiah and Dr Eze of the Paediatric Department of Nisa Hospital educated the patients on ‘Infection in Sickle cell disease’ and ‘Survival of the under-5s’ respectively, while  Dr Olagunju of the Neonatology Unit spoke on the ‘Quality of care for the preterm baby’.

Dr Kike Olagunju (Neonatology Unit)                            Dr Antoniah Hananiah (Paediatrics Unit)

The high point of the event was the interactive Q&A session where the participants and speakers traded knowledge and experiences; some practical solutions to the challenges besieging the healthcare system in Nigeria were also proffered.

 

Certificate of participants was issued and the workshop ended with a group photograph.

 

girl child

Girl Child

The girl child is the future of not just our nation, but the future of the world. Treat her with utmost care,give loads of warmth, and impact positively-that’ll bring a huge difference to the world!

Make it a priority to impact more values to the girl child,encouraging and giving confidence to her,right from childhood. A girl grows into a beautiful flower, inside and outside ,haven being nurtured with positive values and  loads of care and respect.

A happy, positive, and peaceful girl child, becomes a blossoming world;Such a beauty to behold! Let’s be wise and act now,  it begins with me, it’s begins with you! Don’t be afraid, that’s all the world needs, no more , no less :))for it to become what’s meant to be-Happy!

developmental milestones for toddlers

Developmental Milestones For Toddlers (1-2 years of age)

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye-bye” are called developmental milestones. Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave, and move (like crawling, walking, or jumping).

During the second year, toddlers are moving around more, and are aware of themselves and their surroundings. Their desire to explore new objects and people also is increasing. During this stage, toddlers will show greater independence; begin to show defiant behavior; recognize themselves in pictures or a mirror; and imitate the behavior of others, especially adults and older children. Toddlers also should be able to recognize the names of familiar people and objects, form simple phrases and sentences, and follow simple instructions and directions.

Positive Parenting Tips

Following are some of the things you, as a parent, can do to help your toddler during this time:

  • Read to your toddler daily.
  • Ask her to find objects for you or name body parts and objects.
  • Play matching games with your toddler, like shape sorting and simple puzzles.
  • Encourage him to explore and try new things.
  • Help to develop your toddler’s language by talking with her and adding to words she starts. For example, if your toddler says “baba”, you can respond, “Yes, you are right―that is a bottle.”
  • Encourage your child’s growing independence by letting him help with dressing himself and feeding himself.
  • Respond to wanted behaviors more than you punish unwanted behaviors (use only very brief time outs). Always tell or show your child what she should do instead.
  • Encourage your toddler’s curiosity and ability to recognize common objects by taking field trips together to the park or going on a bus ride.

 

Child Safety First

Because your child is moving around more, he will come across more dangers as well. Dangerous situations can happen quickly, so keep a close eye on your child. Here are a few tips to help keep your growing toddler safe:

  • Do NOT leave your toddler near or around water (for example, bathtubs, pools, ponds, lakes, whirlpools, or the ocean) without someone watching her. Fence off backyard pools. Drowning is the leading cause of injury and death among this age group.
  • Block off stairs with a small gate or fence. Lock doors to dangerous places such as the garage or basement.
  • Ensure that your home is toddler proof by placing plug covers on all unused electrical outlets.
  • Keep kitchen appliances, irons, and heaters out of reach of your toddler. Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove.
  • Keep sharp objects such as scissors, knives, and pens in a safe place.
  • Lock up medicines, household cleaners, and poisons.
  • Do NOT leave your toddler alone in any vehicle (that means a car, truck, or van) even for a few moments.
  • Keep your child’s car seat rear-facing as long as possible- it’s the best way to keep her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by the car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, she is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness.

 

Healthy Bodies

  • Give your child water and plain milk instead of sugary drinks. After the first year, when your nursing toddler is eating more and different solid foods, breast milk is still an ideal addition to his diet.
  • Your toddler might become a very picky and erratic eater. Toddlers need less food because they don’t grow as fast. It’s best not to battle with him over this. Offer a selection of healthy foods and let him choose what she wants. Keep trying new foods; it might take time for him to learn to like them.
  • Limit screen time. For children younger than 2 years of age, the AAP recommends that it’s best if toddlers not watch any screen media.
  • Your toddler will seem to be moving continually—running, kicking, climbing, or jumping. Let him be active—he’s developing his coordination and becoming strong.

Culled from the Department of Health & Human Services,USA

Re-edited By The Nisa Media Team.

4 Ways To Make Breastfeeding Easier After Maternity Leave Is Over

What’s one of the biggest hurdles mothers face when breastfeeding? Returning to work.

Having been a nursing mom in the workplace, I know how hard it can be — and I probably had it easier than most. Working in an office, I had a private place to pump. My employer was supportive and gave me the time I needed. Unfortunately, not all women, especially hourly workers, can say the same.

Having regular breaks to pump or breastfeed your baby is a basic need for nursing mothers who work away from their infant. You need to breastfeed your baby or pump every few hours to maintain your milk supply. Working at a restaurant, retail store, factory, or other hourly wage job, you may not have a private place or a schedule that allows you to take a break to pump. But there’s good news: this is changing!

If you’re pregnant or recently gave birth and you want to continue breastfeeding after you go back to work, here are five things that will make it easier. Plan ahead. If you think you will need to pump at work, talk to your s.upervisor sooner rather than later. If possible, make a plan together before you go on maternity leave, so that things will be set up when you return. But if you’re already back at work, talk with your employer.

  1. Think outside of the box! Some workplaces may face more challenges than others when carving out adequate time and space for moms to pump. We’ve gathered hundreds of creative, low-cost ideas to help nursing mothers continue breastfeeding after returning to work.And there’s good reason. Breastfeeding doesn’t just benefit you and your baby — your employer benefits, too! Breastfeeding helps keep babies healthy, which lowers health care costs and means you don’t have to miss work for a doctor’s appointment. Plus, research shows that working women whose breastfeeding goals are supported by their employers are more productive. Companies will also see lower turnover rates because women are more likely to go back to work if they know they’ll have time and space to pump.
  2. Practice before you go back to work. It’s a good idea to practice pumping at home before you return to work. (You may be able to get a breast pump at no extra cost through your health insurance plan.) Once you’re back at work, you’ll probably need to pump two to three times during a typical eight-hour workday, or the number of times your baby needs to feed while you’re away. Be sure to properly store your milk after each pumping session in clean glass or BPA-free plastic bottles or milk storage bags. Then keep it cool in a refrigerator or a cooler with ice packs — you can even freeze it! For a detailed guide to pumping and storing your milk, that will be a topic to tackle on our next blog!
  3. Support nursing moms. You may not need to pump at work, but someone else in your life or workplace might. Your support can make a big difference to a nursing mom. If you’ve had to pump at work in the past, talk to new moms about what worked and didn’t work for you.

I hope these tips will help ease your transition back to work so that you and your baby can enjoy the benefits of breastfeeding long after your maternity leave is over.

Original Article By Dr. Nancy .C. Lee, Deputy Assistance Secretary For Health.

Re-edited By Nisa Media Team.

Ten Things Moms Can Do While Breastfeeding

Ten things moms can do while breastfeeding

Moms are expert multitaskers. They have to be! Taking care of a baby is a 24-hour-a-day job. On the one hand, breastfeeding gives mom a chance to sit back, relax, and enjoy a bonding moment with her baby. But breastfeeding can also be a “time saver” for moms in other ways. By deciding

to breastfeed, you’ve already gained time by not having to sterilize or prepare bottles.

There are lots of ways to pass the time during a breastfeeding session that can allow you to bond with your baby, tackle your “to-do” list, or just be good to yourself. Here are just a few examples:

Talk or sing to your baby

Your baby has been listening to your voice for the past few months inside the womb. So, to a baby, mommy’s voice is the most beautiful sound in the world, no matter what wrong notes you hit. Go ahead and sing any song or rap a few bars to your baby (you can even make it up as you go along). Or talk about your day, read out loud from a book, or share your hopes and dreams for the future. (Your partner can do this, too.) Even when your baby is just a newborn, you’re teaching him or her important language skills every time you speak or sing.

Eat

If your baby’s eating, why shouldn’t Mom grab a bite too? While some new moms get extra hungry, other moms actually forget to eat. Fortunately, there aren’t any strict food rules when you are breastfeeding — only to eat when you’re hungry. Making healthy choices will give you more energy to care for your baby, especially if you eat protein. Nuts, squeezable yogurt, peanut butter or turkey sandwiches, and hard-boiled eggs are easy snacks that you can eat with one hand, and they are all good sources of protein. Meals don’t have to be fancy. Just be sure to eat from the  five group food everyday.

Drink water

Keep a glass or bottle of water right next to your snack plate. The breastfeeding process creates a hormonal reaction that can make you feel thirsty when your milk lets down. While breastfed babies don’t need water to stay hydrated, some babies tend to nurse more if it is hot outside. And, interestingly, your breast milk becomes more watery in hot weather to accommodate a baby’s need for hydration.

Bond with the family 

Every mom deserves her alone time. But what better way to keep your family involved and supportive of your breastfeeding efforts than to bring them in? Those you are most comfortable with can be a great help to you. Beyond the social interaction, you can gain more confidence breastfeeding around other people, and your family members will better appreciate the mom-baby bond. Bonus: Your baby gets to hear everyone’s voices, which helps your baby bond with the family even more. Just be mindful that your visitors don’t interfere with your breastfeeding routine.

Catch up with your girlfriends

New moms can sometimes feel isolated. Don’t get upset if your phone isn’t ringing off the hook. Your friends might be trying to give you some space, that’s all. But trust us: Your girlfriends want to hear from you. Send an email, text message, or instant message, or make a good, old-fashioned phone call. Go down your contact list until you connect with someone to spark a conversation, get caught up, and have a few good laughs. You can even make a date for your friends to come see the baby. Sometimes it helps to give your friends a task: You could ask them to bring you food, pick up some magazines, or braid your hair (which you could also get done while breastfeeding!).

Go social online

You have probably already mastered typing or texting one-handed, so go ahead and post your latest status update on Facebook (even if it’s “Breastfeeding … again!”). Let your friends know how new motherhood is going. Also, Twitter is practically designed for the busy, breastfeeding mom looking for support and advice from other moms. (Check the hashtags #breastfeeding, #BFing, and #bfcafe.) La Leche League and most parenting websites have online forums and message boards for moms, where you can share what you’re going through.

Read

Whether you have an e-reader, read online, or read in print, breastfeeding time is perfect for catching up on what’s going on in the world or just checking out something fun.

Listen to an audiobook

Not the book reading type? Check out your local library or search online for a large selection of audiobooks. Your hands can remain free, and it’s a great way for your baby to be exposed to a larger vocabulary.

Play music … and dance!

Great news for music fans: It’s always good to expose your baby to all sorts of music, from Stevie Wonder to 9th Wonder. You may be surprised what songs your baby responds to. And although dancing while breastfeeding is admittedly an advanced move, you’ll soon find that you can get up and move without breaking a sweat — or your baby’s latch.

Cook, clean, whatever

Once you’ve gotten into a good breastfeeding rhythm, you’ll find that breastfeeding isn’t something that has to be done sitting down. Sometimes, with the aid of a sling or baby wrap, moms find ways to cook meals, do laundry, vacuum, or run errands while breastfeeding. Though, in those first few weeks, if you can have someone else help you, why not?

Culled from the office of the USA department and Human services

Re-edited by the nisa media team.

 

How to Increase Breast Milk Production

Many mothers fear they are not producing enough breast milk to satisfy their baby. In most cases, the fear is based on false alarms, such as shorter nursing times or natural appetite growth. These are natural scenarios many mothers experience when breastfeeding. If your baby, however, is not gaining weight, or worse, if he’s losing weight, then increasing breast milk production can help.

 

  1. Consume a minimum of 1,800 calories a day and drink at least 6 glasses of fluids while you are lactating. If you’re currently dieting, it could be decreasing your milk production. Unsurprisingly, what you eat has a big impact on the quality and quantity of the milk produced. Here are some general guidelines for you to remember about diet and breast milk: •Find excellent sources of calcium. These will help your little baby’s little bones grow healthy and strong. Calcium-rich foods include dairy products (opt for organic dairy products, however), leafy green vegetables, and certain fish (sardines and salmon).
    • Eat fruits and vegetables. Make fruits and vegetables a big part of your diet, as they are packed with vitamins, minerals, and fiber.
    • Opt for complex carbohydrates. Complex carbs are healthier than processed carbs, which you may by and large avoid. Complex carbs include such things as brown rice, whole-grain pasta and bread, as well as beans.
    • Opt for lean meat. Lean meat is better than fatty cuts. Think skinless chicken breast, fish, low-fat dairy products, and soy products like tofu.

  1. Consult your doctor about using prescription or herbal supplements to increase breast milk. Herbs that work well include fenugreek, blessed thistle and red raspberry. The prescription drug metoclopramide is sometimes used as a last resort by doctors to treat low milk production in nursing mothers.
  1. Supplement feedings with pumping. Pumping is beneficial for two reasons. First, pumping allows you to store breast milk when your baby doesn’t need it, allowing you amass and store more expressed milk. Second, pumping stimulates the production of more breast milk.
    • Invest in a high-quality pump. Pumping isn’t exactly the spice of life, so it pays to invest in one that works well. You can rent a hospital-grade pump if you don’t own a high-quality, double pump.
    • Whether you are at work or at home, consider pumping for 15 minutes every couple of hours. Either that, or pump for 5 to 10 minutes after nursing. Pumping at least 8 times during a 24-hour period will help to quickly increase breast milk production. If you can’t pump immediately after nursing, try to pump halfway in between feedings.
  • Pump both breasts at the same time. Pumping both breasts will give you twice as much breast milk twice as fast in addition to helping stimulate more production.
  1. Limit the use of pacifiers and bottles while you’re trying to make more breast milk. This makes sure all your baby’s sucking needs are met at the breast. As the baby gets older, it will be easier for him to go back and forth from breast to pacifier without you losing important breast stimulation. If you are using bottles for supplementing, try to replace those with a syringe or spoon.

Relax. Loads of stress can hurt your ability to produce milk. Try to relax before pumping or breastfeeding by playing soothing music, looking at pictures that produce happiness, or just having a moment with the love of your life. If you want to, try putting warm compresses on your breasts or massaging them for a short period right before you intend to pump or breastfeed.

 

This article is culled from wikihow

Re-edited by the Nisa media Team.

Developmental Milestones for your baby for the 1st 365 days.

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye-bye” are called developmental milestones. Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave, and move (like crawling, walking, or jumping).

In the first year, babies learn to focus their vision, reach out, explore, and learn about the things that are around them. Cognitive, or brain development means the learning process of memory, language, thinking, and reasoning. Learning language is more than making sounds (“babble”), or saying “ma-ma” and “da-da”. Listening, understanding, and knowing the names of people and things are all a part of language development.

During this stage, babies also are developing bonds of love and trust with their parents and others as part of social and emotional development. The way parents cuddle, hold, and play with their baby will set the basis for how they will interact with them and others.

Positive Parenting Tips

Following are some things you, as a parent, can do to help your baby during this time:

  • Talk to your baby. She will find your voice calming.
  • Answer when your baby makes sounds by repeating the sounds and adding words. This will help him learn to use language.
  • Read to your baby. This will help her develop and understand language and sounds.
  • Sing to your baby and play music. This will help your baby develop a love for music and will help his brain development.
  • Praise your baby and give her lots of loving attention.
  • Spend time cuddling and holding your baby. This will help him feel cared for and secure.
  • Play with your baby when she’s alert and relaxed. Watch your baby closely for signs of being tired or fussy so that she can take a break from playing.
  • Distract your baby with toys and move him to safe areas when he starts moving and touching things that he shouldn’t touch.
  • Take care of yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally. Parenting can be hard work! It is easier to enjoy your new baby and be a positive, loving parent when you are feeling good yourself.

Positive Parenting Tip Sheet

Child Safety First

When a baby becomes part of your family, it is time to make sure that your home is a safe place. Look around your home for things that could be dangerous to your baby. As a parent, it is your job to ensure that you create a safe home for your baby. It also is important that you take the necessary steps to make sure that you are mentally and emotionally ready for your new baby. Here are a few tips to keep your baby safe:

    • Do not shake your baby―ever! Babies have very weak neck muscles that are not yet able to support their heads. If you shake your baby, you can damage his brain or even cause his death.
    • Make sure you always put your baby to sleep on her back to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (commonly known as SIDS).
    • Protect your baby and family from secondhand smoke. Do not allow anyone to smoke in your home.
    • Place your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat while he is riding in a car. This is recommended by the Federal Road Safety Commission.
    • Prevent your baby from choking by cutting her food into small bites. Also, don’t let her play with small toys and other things that might be easy for her to swallow.
    • Don’t allow your baby to play with anything that might cover her face.
    • Never carry hot liquids or foods near your baby or while holding him.
  • Vaccines (shots) are important to protect your child’s health and safety. Because children can get serious diseases, it is important that your child get the right shots at the right time. Talk with your child’s doctor to make sure that your child is up-to-date on her vaccinations.

Healthy Bodies

    • Breast milk meets all your baby’s needs for about the first 6 months of life. Between 6 and 12 months of age, your baby will learn about new tastes and textures with healthy solid food, but breast milk should still be an important source of nutrition.
    • Feed your baby slowly and patiently, encourage your baby to try new tastes but without force, and watch closely to see if he’s still hungry.
    • Breastfeeding is the natural way to feed your baby, but it can be challenging. But new parents an always seek assistance of experienced mothers.
    • Keep your baby active. She might not be able to run and play like the “big kids” just yet, but there’s lots she can do to keep her little arms and legs moving throughout the day. Getting down on the floor to move helps your baby become strong, learn, and explore.
  • Try not to keep your baby in swings, strollers, bouncer seats, and exercise saucers for too long.

Limit screen time to a minimum. For children younger than 2 years of age, its recommended that it’s best if babies do not watch any screen media.

Culled from Centers of Disease and Control and prevention USA.
Re-edited by the NISA Media Team
1 2